Friday, 27 December 2019

APPROACHING GALLERIES

Moss & Arbutus - 8x10 en plein air- oil panel
Finding the right fit in a gallery is an important thing.  But it does take time.  You need time to look around at suitable galleries and to have an idea about what sort of work the gallery shows.  It helps to visit the gallery and pay attention to how the work is displayed, how often it is refreshed and what the price points are in comparison to work that you make. 

When all of these things seem in alignment, a request in person or by email on whether or not the gallery is currently seeking new artists is a good idea. In person a gallery owner may say upfront they are or are not seeking new art, and often will explain how to submit if they are. 
Email is less personal, and often an email request to a gallery goes unanswered.  Don't take it personally; but do understand, some things can be learned from no reply: 
1.  They are busy.  Who isn't?  
2.  They don't think they can sell it
3.  They are not seeking new artists at this time. 

In my opinion, no reply to a simple email request tells me something else too:   It tells me that I probably don't really want to do business with that gallery anyway.  Think about it... Would you do business with someone who wasn't available or accessible about business matters?  A professional gallery has the courtesy to at least reply even a standard:  "...at this time we are not currently seeking submissions..."   

An important thing I want from a gallery is a professional gallery / artist relationship.  Make no mistake about it, artists provide a gallery their inventory, in exchange I expect a clear contract and a business approach. 

Five Fun Podcasts For Artists

part of a work in progress in studio today When I'm painting in my studio, one way that I like to zone out and let the work flow is ...